Science

The goal of science education is to develop scientific literacy. Students normally take Science 10 in their first year of high school. Those interested in science at the postsecondary level can choose from a variety of courses at the academic level in grades 11 and 12. For highly motivated students, advanced courses are offered in biology, chemistry and physics. Students must take at least one “first science” credit to graduate—see course descriptions.

Courses

Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
Science 10 Human Biology 11
Oceans 11
Food Science 12
Geology 12
Biology 11
Chemistry 11
Physics 11
Biology 12
Chemistry 12
Physics 12
Advanced Biology 11
Advanced Chemistry 11
Advanced Physics 11
Advanced Biology 12
Advanced Chemistry 12
Advanced Physics 12

Science 10

Academic 1 credit

In Science 10, students are given an opportunity to explore foundation topics in four disciplines of science – biology, chemistry, meteorology and physics – in four separate units of study. Within each unit the students practice and strengthen the skills required to participate in the activities of science, and develop an understanding of concepts within that science discipline. An exploration of the relationship among science, technology, society, and the environment, provides a unifying theme across the four areas of science. Broad topical areas include: sustainability of ecosystems; chemical reactions; weather dynamics; and linear motion. This course serves as a foundation for further studies in science, particularly in biology, chemistry and physics.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.

Human Biology 11

Graduation 1 credit

This course is an academic credit that counts as a second science credit for high school graduation. The major systems of the human body will be covered in this course using an issues based or society and technology point of view. Lab work, projects, group activities and case study examples will be the main learning strategies in this course. This course is designed so that students gain an appreciation for and understanding of the importance of various body functions.

Human Biology 11 does not prepare students for Biology 12.
Note: It is not recommended that students take both Biology 11 and Human Biology 11.
This course does not qualify as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

Oceans 11

Academic 1 credit

This course offers students the opportunity to explore aspects of global and local oceanography and current issues. It is designed to be flexible and meet the needs and interests of Nova Scotian students by connecting the study of oceanography with local economic and community interests. One of the priorities of the course is to increase students’ knowledge of emerging economies and opportunities in areas such as aquaculture and oceans management that offer new career opportunities. Topics may include: oceans-structure and motion, the marine biome, aquaculture, the fisheries resource, coastal zones, ocean industries, and coastal navigation.

This course does not qualify as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

Biology 11

Academic 1 credit

The course consists of 4 major units of study: matter and energy, biodiversity, maintaining dynamic equilibrium in biological systems, and interactions among living things. The course follows a student-centered approach to learning, allowing the students to first explore concepts through activities and labs. A further aim of the course is to improve the student’s understanding of biology as a science through the integration of mathematics and the strengthening of science process skills whenever possible.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit. Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

Advanced Biology 11

Academic 1 credit

This course parallels the Biology 11 course, but more emphasis is placed on research and independent study. Most topics are covered in greater depth. The laboratory is used extensively and some units may be covered as lab block assignments. Students wishing a more in-depth study of biology should consider this course. It is highly recommended for students considering a career in biology.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

Chemistry 11

Academic 1 credit

The high school Chemistry program is divided into two courses, Chemistry 11 and Chemistry 12. Chemistry 11 is designed to be both an introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry for the science-bound student and an appropriate course for the student interested in the humanities. The more rigorous material required for students taking postsecondary chemistry is reserved for Chemistry 12. Students will learn about the composition of matter and how one kind of matter can be changed into other kinds of matter. The topics covered by the text are reinforced with laboratory work. Topics covered include: matter, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding, naming compounds and writing chemical formulae, types of chemical reactions, balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry and an introduction to organic chemistry. This course should be completed by students wishing to take Biology 12.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit. To be successful in this course, a student should have successfully completed Mathematics 10 Academic and Science 10.

Advanced Chemistry 11

Advanced 1 credit

This course is an excellent introduction to chemistry for those students who have an above average interest and proven ability in science. The course focuses on the development of reasoning skills and problem solving techniques through experimentation and theory. Concepts and principles are emphasized rather than content. Topics include: naming compounds and formula writing, quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, gas laws, gas stoichiometry, an introduction to solution chemistry, atomic theory, periodic law and chemical bonds between atoms.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
To be successful in this course, a student should have successfully completed Mathematics 10 Academic and Science 10.

Physics 11

Academic 1 credit

Physics is the branch of knowledge that studies matter and energy – their transformations and interactions. Knowledge of physics provides insights into understanding natural phenomena, the search for cleaner alternate sources of energy and exploration of the universe. This introductory course includes kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy and waves.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit. Students should have successfully completed Mathematics 10 Academic and Science 10.

Advanced Physics 11

Advanced 1 credit

This is an introductory course in physics for highly motivated students with a particular interest in science and proven ability in mathematics and who have demonstrated an exceptional degree of academic ability or achievement. Topics include: linear kinematics, vectors, dynamics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, waves, sound and light. Note: This course is highly recommended for students pursuing careers in the physical or engineering sciences.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit. To be successful in this course, a student should have successfully completed Mathematics 10 Academic and Science 10.

Food Science 12

Academic 1 credit

Food Science is designed to heighten students’ awareness and understanding of the relationships among science, technology and food. The course will include a laboratory component where work will be required in both the science and food labs. Course Study is developed around the following four modules:
Module 1: Food Constituents
Module 2: Preservation Factors
Module 3: Food Quality and Commodities Module 4: Food Packaging

This course does not qualify as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

Geology 12

Academic 1 credit

This course is designed to explore the processes at work on Earth today, how they contribute to the landforms we see around us, and the impact of the interactions between people and Earth. The topics included are the structure and history of the Earth, minerals, rocks and the rock cycle, the internal and external processes that contribute to the development of mineral resources, mountains, glaciers, groundwater, volcanoes and earthquakes, the theories geologists have developed to explain their observations, geologic time, and the impact of human decisions on our mineral resources and our environment. Whenever possible, the local geology will be used to illustrate the topics. Laboratory work and independent projects will enhance the topics being studied.

This course does not qualify as a “first science” credit. Recommended Prerequisite: At least one previous science course

Biology 12

Academic 1 credit

This course has “continuity of life” as a central theme. Students learn about general reproductive patterns in the biological world, embryonic development in animals, human reproductive systems and development. Homeostasis through hormonal and nervous control is studied within this context. Other topics of study involve genetics, biotechnology and evolution through genetic variation. Laboratory work, class discussion and project work are stressed. Note: This course is recommended for students considering careers in science or science-related fields [e.g. health professions].

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisites: Biology 11 and Chemistry 11

Advanced Biology 12

Advanced 1 credit

This course parallels the Biology 12 course, but more emphasis is placed on research and independent study and most topics are covered in greater depth. The laboratory is used extensively and some units may be covered as lab block assignments. Students wishing a more in-depth study of biology should consider this course. It is highly recommended for students considering a career in biology.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisites: Biology 11 and Chemistry 11

Chemistry 12

Academic 1 credit

This is a continuation of Chemistry 11. Topics include: a review of some of Chemistry 11, thermo chemistry, solutions, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids/bases and oxidation/reduction.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisites: Chemistry 11 and Mathematics 11

Advanced Chemistry 12

Advanced 1 credit

This course is a continuation of Advanced Chemistry 11. Topics in this course are given an in-depth mathematical treatment and include: thermochemistry, entropy, electrochemistry, kinetics, chemical equilibria in solution and the gas phase, acid-base equilibria.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisite: Advanced Chemistry 11, a Grade 11 Mathematics credit, and the prior approval of the Department Head.

Physics 12

Academic 1 credit

The first half of the course focuses on Force, Motion, Work and Energy. Topics such as dynamics, projectiles, circular motion and universal gravitation will be covered. A unit on Field theory will cover electricity, gravitation and magnetism. The course ends with two short units – an introduction to Modern Physics and Radioactivity.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisite: Physics 11 and a Grade 11 Mathematics credit.

Advanced Physics 12

Advanced 1 credit

The Advanced Physics 12 course is a continuation of Advanced Physics 11. The emphasis is on energy as a unifying concept. The topics include: momentum and the conservation of momentum, work, power, energy, kinetic and potential energy, electricity, Coulomb’s Law, circuits, electric fields, magnetism, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction and electromagnetic waves, the structure of the atom and the nucleus, radioactivity, nuclear energy and nuclear reactors, and a major project.

This course qualifies as a “first science” credit.
Recommended Prerequisites: Advanced Physics 11 and a Grade 11 Mathematics credit