Social Studies

Courses

Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
History 10
History 10 Pre-IB
African Canadian Studies 11
Canadian History 11
Gaelic Studies 11
Economics 11
History 11
Mi’kmaw Studies 11
Comparative World Religions 12
Economics 12
Global Geography 12
Global History 12
Law 12
Political Science 12
Sociology 12

History 10

Academic 1 credit

This course focuses on ancient history and allows students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the concept of civilization through the examination of the origins of civilization and a comparison of some civilizations that have contributed to the nature of the modern world. There are five broad chronological divisions in the course: The Evolution of Human Beings, the Birth of Civilizations, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Each of these divisions can be considered from a number of points of view including geography, archaeology, society, language, religion and politics. Development of Social Studies skills, such as researching, writing essays and analysis of documentary evidence will be emphasized.

African Canadian Studies 11

Academic 1 credit

This course is an introduction to the historical experience of African peoples. This course provides an overview of African history and the African Diaspora (dispersal) to the “New World” with particular emphasis on the African Nova Scotia experience. The course will equip students with a sound understanding of the experiences, local achievements and contributions of people of African descent. Students will discuss the geographical, historical, economic, political and social experiences, struggles and life stories of a people who have made a significant contribution to world history.

This course fulfills the provincial Canadian History graduation requirement.

Canadian History 11

Academic 1 credit

This course uses both a chronological and a thematic approach to Canadian History through the study of continuing or persistent questions that have deep historical roots for previous generations of Canadians. Globalization, Development, Governance, Sovereignty and Justice are among the continuing/persistent questions that this course will address. This course has an online component.

This course fulfills the provincial Canadian History graduation requirement.

Gaelic Studies 11

Academic 1 credit

This course affirms the language, history, tradition, and art of Nova Scotia and other Canadian Gaels, and explores the continuing influence of the Gaelic culture on life in local, national and global contexts. Learning experiences in this course will enable all students to develop knowledge and understanding of and respect for the unique nature of the Gaelic culture. Gaelic Studies 11 provides opportunities for students to experience the diversity of expression of many aspects of Gaelic culture and to recognize the values inherent in Gaelic community life. It presents unique opportunities to take learning beyond the classroom to include community and industry. The course focuses on history and identity, oral tradition and literature, and the arts of the Gaels.

This course fulfills the provincial Canadian History graduation requirement.

Economics 11

Academic 1 credit

This course places a specific emphasis on the basic economic structure of Canada and the role Canada plays in a global economic community. Economics 11 will enable students to examine aspects of Canada’s economy that affect them as individuals and as part of the global community. Students will explore the basis for economic study with the critical thinking skills necessary for interpreting economic events and making informed personal economic choices. Students will explore the following topics: basis for economic study, role of money, supply and demand, markets and the economy, production and productivity, inflation and unemployment, government involvement in the economy, and distribution of income and wealth in Canada.

History 11

Academic 1 credit

This course covers the major developments in technology, political systems, rights and knowledge from the Middle- Ages to modern times. Its focus is on European events and trends, revolution, ideology, conquests and growth of various empires. Major topics in this course include the Renaissance, Reformation, France during the 17th Century, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Era, the Russian Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, Communism, and the World Wars.

Mi’kmaw Studies 11

Academic 1 credit

Mi’kmaw Studies 11 is a course that serves not only to highlight the Mi’kmaw experience, but also to provide opportunities for learners to gain an understanding how they are connected to the history and culture of the First Peoples of the Maritimes. The course incorporates an inquiry-based approach and examines broad concepts such as governance, culture, justice, spirituality, and education. Students will analyse historical and contemporary Mi’kmaw issues, which enables them to achieve a greater understanding of, and respect for, both Mi’kmaw society and Mi’kmaw contributions to Canadian society.

This course fulfills the provincial Canadian History graduation requirement.

Comparative World Religions 12

Academic 1 credit

This course examines the nature of religion and its origin and place in human society. Students will study and analyze the five major religious traditions of the world today — Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Throughout the course of study, an emphasis will be placed on similarities among the various religious philosophies. This course will foster a student understanding of the diversity of religions, religious experiences, religious practice, and the reasons for particular expressions of religious belief within a society or culture. Comparative World Religion 12 encourages a comprehensive and balanced examination of the prevailing ideas and attitudes pertaining to religion as a component of human culture.

Economics 12

Academic 1 credit

This course provides a systematic and in-depth study of economic issues and theories. By providing a balanced and wide range of perspectives, students will be encouraged to evaluate and debate real-world economic issues for themselves. Analytical and critical thinking skills will be emphasized throughout the course. Major units will include microeconomics theory (supply and demand, the theory of the firm) and macroeconomics theory (economic growth, government policy, economic indicators). Optional units will be chosen from topics such as the history of economic ideas, international trade, and interpreting economic data. Students will have the opportunity to complete a project and participate in a national stock market competition.

Recommended Prerequisite: Economics 11

Global Geography 12

Academic 1 credit

This course features eight compulsory units, which are based on the standard themes and skills of the discipline of geography. These units are: Our Fragile Planet, Environmental Hazards, The Peopled Planet, Feeding the Planet, Global Resources, Global Factory, Urbanization and The Future Planet. Each unit is based upon a theme which is fundamental to the key question upon which the course is built: “How did the world arrive at its current state?” This course fulfills the provincial Global Studies graduation requirement and is only open to grade 12 students.

Global History 12

Academic 1 credit

This course examines the major themes in the history of the Post-World War II Era. Students will examine these themes in five compulsory units: East-West: The Role of Super Power in the Post – World War II Era, The Pursuit of Justice, Societal and Technological Change, Acknowledging Global Interdependence, and The Legacy of the Twentieth Century. In their study of these units, students will examine history from three perspectives – social, economic, and political – and will use the research and inquiry skills of the historian. Throughout their studies, students will address the focus question of the course: “Has humanity emerged into a world whose actions are governed more by interdependence at the global level than by dependence or independence at the national or international level? “ Likewise, they will be able to propose reasonable answers to the question upon which Nova Scotia’s global studies courses are built – “How did the world arrive at its current state?”

This course fulfills the provincial Global Studies graduation requirement and is only open to grade 12 students.

Law 12

Academic 1 credit

The Canadian Law course is designed to provide students with knowledge of law and its function in society and the opportunity to develop skills and attitudes that will enable them to understand the process of law. Topics include the Nova Scotia court system, law-making procedure, criminal law procedure, civil law and individual disputes, jury selection, drug and alcohol offences, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Tort law. A visit to a Court session will usually be included.

Political Science 12

Academic 1 credit

This course will be an introduction to the fundamentals of politics. The basic needs of humanity will be examined through a variety of psychological and philosophical perspectives in order to understand the theoretical process of instituting government. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the ideas of the great thinkers of the Western political tradition. In-depth analysis of the historical and moral implications of the political systems, from Marxism to democracy, which arose as a result of the age of ideology will be a central component of study. Knowledge of the Canadian political system will also be a central feature of this course. This course will require intense and critical introspective reflection.

Recommended prerequisite: Successful completion of a History course at the grade 11 level.

Sociology 12

Academic 1 credit

Sociology 12 is designed to give an understanding of the basic aspect of sociology and its related discipline of anthropology and psychology. It allows students to apply the main sociological research methods to examine Canadian sociological issues. All societies have social issues such as crime, poverty, divorce, and discrimination that affect the way they interact. Students will examine these controversial issues from an open-minded perspective. In order to do so, they will learn about biases and use this knowledge to deconstruct various texts. The course will attempt to develop an understanding of and an appreciation for different personalities, cultures and behaviours that exist. In addition, it will allow for selfawareness and encourage individual thought and expression. Sociology 12 covers a variety of topics that will be of interest to the students as sociologists and also as teenagers. They will discover the nature and history of sociology through a variety of methods. The course focuses on topics such as human behaviours, socialization and development, prejudice and discrimination, culture, aggression and violence, and deviance and social control.